Measurement Education Options: How to Reinvent Yourself as a Measurement Maven

A photo illustrating a man working on his measurement education.

This is an updated version of an earlier post, “Going Back to Measurement School,” in Katie Paine’s Measurement Blog.

We here at Paine Publishing have always been in the business of measurement education. Newsletters (The Gauge, in the last century; then, beginning in 2002, The Measurement Standard; and now, since 2013, The Measurement Advisor), the Measurement Summit (our first was almost 20 years ago!), and several books are just a fraction of the educational resources we’ve offered over the years. (See The Measurement Mall for more.)

Our most recent measurement education offering is Measurement Base Camp, an intensive course (now online) that covers the basic vital skills for measurement today. (For more on measurement skills of the very near future, read “Reimagining the Skill Set of a Professional Communicator: 7 Vital Skills for Your Future.”)

As we gear up for whatever comes next, communicators clearly thirst for new skill sets. Perhaps it’s the stay-at-home orders, or the rising importance of metrics and data in the communications decision-making process. For whatever reason, more and more people have been asking me about how to learn more about measurement. The other day on the PRSA forums the question came up and there were a ton of responses and referrals.

So we decided to assemble the answers along with some research of our own all into one table to help you decide on the best measurement education solution for your schedule and needs. Below you can compare our Measurement Base Camp to other popular measurement education offerings. We’ll be continuing to update it so if we’re missing a great course that you know about please get in touch!

Here you go.

Agreed Upon ValuesField DescriptionExample Notes
MessageMessages are those key ideas, concepts, and positioning statements that the company desires to communicate to its target audiences. - Most innovative
- Strong commitment to CSR
- Best place to work
Author The person or persons who wrote the article or news story. If many, then make the list comma separated.Maggie Haberman, New York Times Record last name first, e.g., Haberman, Maggie. Record the media outlet in a separate column.
Company The organization and/or its peers or competitors.- Apple
Microsoft
- Corporation for National Community Service
- NBC
Business Group or DivisionA specific line of business or division that has a name separate from the company.- iPhone
- Xbox
- Americorps
- MSNBC
Business SegmentsDefined vertical market segments - Government
- Healthcare
- Manufacturing
Product A specific product name being tracked.- IphoneX
- Rachel Maddow Show
itemIDEach record must have an unique number. Start with 100 so that each item in the batch is assigned a number, even if it is not coded. If there are several coders each should be given a range of numbers to represent their batch.- 1001
- 1002
- 1003
Always check for duplicate numbers before analyzing any data.
HeadlineThe title of the article- Apple closes WWDC 2017 lottery, begins notifying winning developers
TopicsA specific news topic, event, or moment in time that may drive coverage.- Apple Developers Conference
- 2018 elections
This is useful to understand what is driving coverage.
Program A campaign, initiative, or other internal effort to generate exposure or engagement around an cause, message, or product.- Southwest launches new "Transfarency" initiative This is used to track the specific contribution of the campaign to the overall goals.
Positive ToneItem leaves a reader more likely to purchase, support, invest in, work for, or recommend the brand/product/company.- Apple iPhone XR Review: A Cheaper Phone Suited to Most of Us
Negative ToneItem leaves a reader less likely to purchase, support, invest in, work for, or recommend the brand/product/company.- Origins of an Epidemic, Purdue Pharma knew its Opioids were widely abused.
Neutral ToneIf an item does not influence the reader either way and/or contains no sentiment.
- In 2013 ESPN ended its collaboration with PBS Frontline
Balanced ToneIf an item contains both positive and negative sentiment in equal weights.
- Sesame Street moving to HBO, but PBS will still air reruns
Prominence The degree to which a particular company or product is mentioned in an article, e.g., is it mentioned many times, or in the headline?- High
- Medium
- Low
Media OutletThe name of the outlet that published the article.- Tech Radar
Publication Category If appropriate, you may want to group various outlets into categories .- Tech,
- Business
- Consumer
- Gaming
Publication Rank (High/Medium/Low)A ranking of importance of specific media outlets based on how influential they are to your target audiences.- Low
- Medium
- High
Published Date (Format: DD-MM-YY)The date the Article ID was posted online or in print.- 04-11-17
IssueGeneric initiative or industry topic messages predefined by the client.- Innovation
- Privacy
- AI
- Big data
- Security
SummaryA summary of the article.- Microsoft manages to cram artificial intelligence on the Raspberry Pi 3 PC board
URLThe specific URL associated with an article.- https://venturebeat.com/2017/03/31/all-of-googles-jokes-for-april-fools-day-2017/
STANDARDS TEST: Does the item meet the criteria for a 'media hit':All items must at least meet the core criteria of "earned" media and be about one of the brands and occur in the date range of xxx to xxx.
Is the item an original piece of content, not created or owned by the company? Is the comment or tweet generated from outside the company? If yes, move forward with coding. If no, do not include in the study. When reading tweets, if clarification is needed please follow link provided in tweet but only code tweet for the content in the actual tweet. Coding social media posts also involves looking at pictures in the post to determine sentiment and messaging.
Media TypeItem can be either a tweet, a comment, or a post.- 0=Not sure
- 1=Tweet
- 2=Facebook comment
- 3=Facebook post
Check for consistency and omissions.
Outlet Title Title of media outlet (use sentence case: upper and lower case letters.- Twitter
- The New York Times
Check for blank fields and inconsistency in title entry.
Author The author of the post or comment.
VisualInclusion of any chart, graph, logo, photo, or other image that conveys a company 'presence' in the item is coded. Visuals can be desirable, e.g., neutral, balanced, or positive; or they can be undesirable, i.e., leaves the reader less likely to support, work for, or do business with the organization. - 0=No visual
- 1=Desirable visual
- 2=UndesIrable Visual
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